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Easter Mathematical Activities

16 Mar

Last year we blogged about some of our favourite resources to use at Easter time (read the blog post here) a lot of these resources, and others on the web, are aimed at KS2 or lower ability KS3 students. So this time around I have designed four activities aimed specifically at secondary students;

In the first activity students have to use their skills of adding and subtracting fractions to ‘collect the Easter joke’. The questions are increasingly difficult; starting with common denominators to finding common denominators, to adding and subtracting mixed numbers.

In the second activity students have to use angle properties of parallel lines, isosceles triangles and angles in polygons to calculate missing angles and then shade in the grid to create a picture of a basket of Easter eggs.

The third resource pupils have to find the mode, median or range from a list of numbers, final questions require the evaluation of algebraic terms first.

 

 

Finally in the last resource students have to rearrange the functions to the form y=mx+c in order to identify the gradient. Again this is a Math At activity and pupils will shade all the squares with that answer.

These could be used with KS3 and KS4 students and could form part of the lesson or be set as a homework task depending on how you get students to approach them. Instructions and ideas for support and extension are given within each resource, the solutions are also given at the end. If you like these resources you can check out our other resources in our TES store here.

Check out Whieldon’s mini mystery here or below is an example of a free Mathematical mystery.

.CaptureGet in touch @numberloving and check out our free and premium resources in our TES NumberLoving Store.

2012 in review

31 Dec

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

19,000 people fit into the new Barclays Center to see Jay-Z perform. This blog was viewed about 91,000 times in 2012. If it were a concert at the Barclays Center, it would take about 5 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

Get in touch @numberloving and check out our free and premium resources in our TES NumberLoving Store.

Mathematical Whodunit?

30 Sep

Halloween is such a fun time of year and it’s great to try and bring some of that excitement into your classroom, I’ve never found a really good Halloween themed resource so at Number-Loving we set about trying to make some!

To kick things off we have a Mathematical Whodunit, this is born out of my love (and unbeaten record) of the board game Cluedo.

The setting is the hotel ‘Spooksville’, the victim is the elusive ‘Mr Black’ and there are six suspects.

The idea is that students work in groups of 5-7, each assuming the identity of one of the characters. They each get a character card which gives them answers to three questions. On their turn they can ask a fellow player one of these question. There’s also a pool of general evidence for students to look at to help them in determining who the murderer is.

The task is quite complex so depending on the class you may need to structure it for them – e.g. tell them for the first 10 minutes they have to find out about the crime itself, then for the next ten they have to find out who had a motive, then who had the means and finally who had opportunity. But if your class are quite used to mysteries and open tasks then you can probably just leave them to it! The Maths is mostly functional and includes:

  • Interpreting time in 12 hour and 24 hour
  • Maps and scales
  • Speed, distance and time
  • Reading timetables and mileage charts
  • Reading bank statements
  • Applying logic and working methodically

In the resource I have summarised a few alternative ways to play – one idea being to get members of the department dressed up as the characters and play the game at an open evening or collapsed timetable day.

I haven’t used this with a class yet – I’m going to save it for my last lesson before Halloween, if anyone does use it I’d love to hear how it goes. You can tweet us @laurareeshughes and @numberloving. Check out our free and premium resources in our TES NumberLoving Store.

Outdoor Learning – The first instalment!

5 Mar

As the weather starts to improve there’s nothing quite like breaking free from the confines of your classroom and letting your students loose outside! Everyday this week I will be blogging about an idea to get your students up and out of the classroom…

Trigonometry in real life

This lesson has always gone down really well with my students. You need to have studied using trig for calculating missing sides and angles in right-angled triangles. I would split this into two 50 minute sessions (or some equivalent of this!) this is the Powerpoint I have used in the past – you could update it with pictures from around your school!

Lesson 1:

Present students with a question like ‘how could we work out the height of the school?’ (slide 2) and get them to brainstorm ideas. If you need to then show them slide 3 and guide them through the process of using trig. Then ask them how they might measure the length of the base and the angle. The rest of the lesson can be spent making the clinometers, some really clear instructions on a printable worksheet are available here. And designing their data collection table. You will need some trundle wheels or long tape-measures (raid the PE department!)

Lesson 2:

Group students into threes and off they go! You would probably want to place yourself somewhere central so you can keep an eye on them and you are available for help! In my experience it is also worth giving each group a little ticket you have signed explaining that they are meant to be out of class.

Back in the classroom after half an hour or so you can reveal the heights and get students to calculate the difference between their answers and yours, then they can calculate the average which you can compare to pick a winner. In with this you can discuss the accuracy of their results and even other applications.

We hope you enjoy these ideas! Get in touch @numberloving and check out our free and premium resources in our TES NumberLoving Store.

Christmaths Collection Part 2

11 Dec

Not forgetting the fabulous 12 games of christmas on the TES, these 12 games are designed for primary but you can select the level of difficulty so they are suitable as a starter for your KS3 classes, I will be kicking off my lessons with one of these each day leading upto Christmas. Great fun!

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