Pie Chart Free Resources up to Higher GCSE Maths

Reading and interpreting pie charts activity free download GCSE Maths 9-1 Higher

A quick blog to share free set of pie chart resources, require no-prep printable downloads, that we produced when NumberLoving joined up with LittleStreams in collaboration.

The worksheets produced by Littlestreams help introduce how to calculate angles in order to construct Pie Charts. Once pupils are able to construct, you can move them into completing the NumberLoving Treasure Hunt. This requires pupils to interpret pie charts; finding amounts from pie chart sectors and includes questions similar to those included in Higher EdExcel and AQA GCSE Maths papers.

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The two resources can be downloaded for free using the links below;

LittleStreams drawing pie charts worksheets

Check out our Teacher Hack blog post below which will mean no excuses when pupils say “I haven’t got a protractor”! Maths Teacher Hack- Part 1

Get in touch via @numberloving or NumberLoving’s Facebook page!

You might also be interested in visiting our TES store and our TPT Store for both free and premium resources.

Thank you for reading

NumberLoving Sharon

Pi Day Resources

It is nearly Pi Day, March 14th (3.14), so to celebrate try some of our resources from the seasonal Pi Day bundle. This bundle consists of three resources described below. pie Pi Day Relay Race pi relay raceA set of 16 relay race questions suitable for able KS4 pupils. The questions are progressively difficult, starting with the basics (see picture) to solving problems involving area, circumference or volume. Print one set of questions for each group on different colours. Each group has a team captain, they retrieve the question from the front , taking it to the team to answer. Once they are confident they’ve got it correct they return it for marking. If correct they get 10 points and the next question. If they are wrong they can have a second attempt for 9 points. Pi Day Collect a Joke The pupils must calculate progressively difficult fractions of amounts (suitable for KS3 pupils), each answer gives a letter spelling out the punchline to the Pi Day joke. This resources includes ‘red herrings’ for quick self and teacher assessment. This resource is free to download as part of try before you buy! Pi Day Mystery Pupils are challenged to use the clues to plot all five circles and find the point of intersection. They will need to use and inverse the formulas for the area and circumference of a circle, as well as some Pythagoras’ Theorem. Each resource includes instructions, ideas for support/extension and solutions. All three are available in our Pi Day bundle, check it out here. Check out this blog “Plan a Pi Day Party” by Gary Hopkins for Educational world for more great ideas and resources to celebrate Pi Day. Get in touch @numberloving and follow our Facebook NumberLoving Page Check out our free and premium resources in our TES NumberLoving Store.

Bells for BIDMAS and More

Hi there! We haven’t blogged in a while as we are busy behind the scenes bringing you some changes to the website and a lot of great new resources, please watch this space!

UntitledBIDMAS Bells

The class is split into eight groups and each group is given a bell. Each bell is numbered, if the answer to the question is the same as their group’s bell they should ring the bell. At first the pupils are likely to be too slow to recognise the tune and therefore you may need to go back the beginning and repeat to here the tune. It is an ideal activity for a short plenary.

In this version of the game the order of the questions is important and should follow the same numbers as the tunes provided on the tun sheet. You set some of the pupils a challenge to come up with questions relevant to the topic studying which give the answers to follow one of the tunes provided with the bells.

This bidmas-bells-twinkle-twinkle resource contains questions which if played in the correct order will play the tune “twinkle twinkle little star”.

Other Ideas

Another adaption would be to group pupils and give each group a bell. All pupils will be given an answer card, and for each answer card there is a question. The order of the questions is again important. Use the interactive display board to pose a question to the class, if pupils have the answer to the question the ring the bell. The trick here is to first make the questions and answers, one for each note of the tune. Then assign each question card to the corresponding bell by numbering the question card. Then group all the cards for each bell, mixing them up so the order isn’t clear.For example if the tune was 1, 2, 2 (the numbers on the bell) a pupil from the group with bell one would need the answer to question 1 and pupils from the group with bell 2 would need the answers to question 2 and 3! This is slightly more complicated to prepare but worth it. My top tip is to label the back of the answer cards with which bell number it belongs to!

They can also add fun to quizzes or team games, not as tuneful but great fun!

About the Bells

The bells are called handbells and are sold in sets. You can buy them from here and many other places, always check that they come with a handy tune sheet.

We hope you find the ideas useful and we would love to hear your feedback on how the ideas work for you. Get in touch @numberloving and check out our free and premium resources in our TES NumberLoving Store.

Thanks for reading!

Body Surface Area and other fun tasks!

bodies

One of my absolute favourite websites for practical lesson ideas is teach maths. It is full of free lesson plans across the whole curriculum, more importantly all of the lessons are hands on and practical. So far I have tried two lessons from this site, both of which have been brilliant!

The first of these is on body-surface area, the plan is available here. Basically students have to calculate the surface area of their body. In order to do this they have to split their body into different shapes (I show them the slide above for inspiration) then they take the necessary measurements to calculate the surface area of each shape. This has a lot of real-life applications, the most interesting being calculating doses for things like chemotherapy. Once they have an answer there is a formula which the medical profession use, they can apply this formula to see how close their estimates are.

The second lesson is on discovering the formulae for the volume of a pyramid, the lesson plan is available here. In this lesson students construct six pyramids which they fit together to make a cube. They can then see that the volume of one pyramid is one sixth of the volume of the cube, a bit of algebra later and hey presto the formula for the volume of a pyramid is discovered!

pyramid

 

Both of these lessons have worked really well for me, students have been really engaged and more importantly have been forced to think for themselves. Along with these lessons are many other brilliant ideas which I can’t rate highly enough, well worth a look.

Get in touch @numberloving and check out our free and premium resources in our TES NumberLoving Store.

Easter Mathematical Activities

Last year we blogged about some of our favourite resources to use at Easter time (read the blog post here) a lot of these resources, and others on the web, are aimed at KS2 or lower ability KS3 students. So this time around I have designed four activities aimed specifically at secondary students;

In the first activity students have to use their skills of adding and subtracting fractions to ‘collect the Easter joke’. The questions are increasingly difficult; starting with common denominators to finding common denominators, to adding and subtracting mixed numbers.

In the second activity students have to use angle properties of parallel lines, isosceles triangles and angles in polygons to calculate missing angles and then shade in the grid to create a picture of a basket of Easter eggs.

The third resource pupils have to find the mode, median or range from a list of numbers, final questions require the evaluation of algebraic terms first.

 

 

Finally in the last resource students have to rearrange the functions to the form y=mx+c in order to identify the gradient. Again this is a Math At activity and pupils will shade all the squares with that answer.

These could be used with KS3 and KS4 students and could form part of the lesson or be set as a homework task depending on how you get students to approach them. Instructions and ideas for support and extension are given within each resource, the solutions are also given at the end. If you like these resources you can check out our other resources in our TES store here.

Check out Whieldon’s mini mystery here or below is an example of a free Mathematical mystery.

.CaptureGet in touch @numberloving and check out our free and premium resources in our TES NumberLoving Store.