Dance Maths

Dancing and Maths may not seem like an obvious combination, perhaps because dancing is generally considered to be good fun. This idea came about as part of an open evening which was Disco themed but it has now become a regular activity in my lessons.

The idea centres around the fact that lots of maths questions have an answer between 1 and 99. To start you will need a class set of ‘dance mats’, I made mine using some non-slip fabric meant for swimming baths and some spray paint, alternatively you could use sugar paper and sticky-back plastic.

Each student is given a mat, you then flash questions up on the IWB, students left leg represents the tens and their right leg the units. They have to move so that their feet match the answer to the question e.g. if the answer were 52 they would have their left leg on ‘5’ and their right leg on ‘2’. The next question then appears and they jump to the next answer. Along with some music and a bit of momentum you get students dancing along to BIDMAS, volume, solving equations or any topic you can think of! See our bundle of dance mat maths in our tpt shop or tes store for some ready made activities that you can use with your Dance Math Mats.

My students really enjoy this of any ability and it really helps to engage the kinaesthetic learners, you may have a few students who initially don’t want to join in (until they see how much fun it is!) in which case I let them answer on mini-whiteboards instead.

If you try this out we would love to hear from you, tweet us  @numberloving or email at numberloving@outlook.com  and check out our free and premium resources in our TES NumberLoving Store.

Maths Party!


Maths and party are not two words you often hear in the same sentence but party games provide us with some great ways to engage students in the classroom. Here are a few of my favourite ideas:

Pass the parcel:

A simple idea which is great for a starter. this works very much as the party game but each layer has a question selotaped to it, before students can unwrap their layer they have to answer the question! In the past I have asked each student to write a question on a slip of paper as a plenary, then I use these questions in the pass the parcel the following lesson. I have done this with GCSE groups too and used exam questions cut up from a past paper. Students to the left and right can peer mark the answer to check it is correct! I have my classroom organised into five tables so I make five ‘parcels’ so each table has one to pass around, but you could adapt this depending on how your room is set up. All you need is some music and a prize for the middle and away you go!

 

Balloon modelling:

Balloon modelling is an exciting venture for anyone, old or young, this PowerPoint “Welcome to the fun fair!!” takes you through the steps needed to make a balloon dog. Students have to measure their balloon (bought cheaply from homebargains, be sure to leave a 10cm section at the end which is un-inflated) then work out and mark the fractions on (starting from the end which is tied), then they fold and twist. It really is simple and makes a great fun lesson when studying fractions of amounts, it could be adapted to work for percentages or ratio. You could also extend the idea and get students to investigate making some of their own models! The video below shows how to make the twists, if you have younger students you may want to do this for them:

Four corners

This is great for types of shapes or number types. In each corner of the room you have a picture of a shape or a number hung up. You call out a property such as ‘four vertices’ or ‘square number’ and students must go to the corner which fits that property. If students go to the wrong one they are ‘out’ and should sit down, you can make it progressively more challenging by having several conditions they have to meet.

Simon says

This is a classic which can be adapted for practising drawing shapes, you give an instruction – for example ‘Simon says draw a horizontal line 4 cm in length’ and students have to do it, you continue on in this way until they have constructed a shape, the catch is sometimes you give an instruction which does not start with ‘Simon says’ in this case they should not follow it. Get ready for chaos!

Keep tuned as this week I will also be blogging about dance maths… Get in touch @numberloving and check out our free and premium resources in our NumberLoving Store.

Mathematic Fortune Tellers

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You may remember these fortune tellers, or cootie catchers as known in the USA, from your youth? In my day we used them to find out what your future held or who you would ‘obviously’ marry!

Well, Number Loving have introduced them into mathematics lessons and they are our new resources which have been added to our online store in a bundle, check it out here.

Resources

On the right is an example of a fortune teller which is ready and this one is free to download from our store here. First you will notice the colours, as with all our resources these colours relate to levels of difficulty. Therefore differentiation is present from the start; green is the hardest, amber is medium and red the easiest.

 

Construction

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Once printed pupils will need to fold along the grey lines and make to look like the picture above. Instructions on how to fold the fortune teller are included in the resource.

There are plenty of videos like the one below which also show how to fold.

Playing the game

Again we have included instructions for those who have forget how to play. You can also check out this post.

Each purchase includes a blank version, as this is great to ask pupils to create their own to challenge their partners or even their teacher!

Why not make a big fortune teller with the whole class? Use masking tape to tape each square piece of paper together.

Get in touch @numberloving and check out our free and premium resources in our NumberLoving Store.

Crazy Cocktails – Ratio and Proportion gets a facelift!

Ratio and proportion is such a hands on topic it deserves more than a lesson on recipes for spaghetti Bol and pancakes. So why not try out some cocktails!

This has to be one of my favourite lessons, ideally ran over two sessions. In session one you discuss recipes and strategies for working out different quantities (example of Pomegranate Paradise is below), students then complete the four modeled examples on this sheet. In the next session students use the examples for inspiration and make up their own cocktail, they have to work out the cost of making 100 and the % profit (worksheet here). Then they get to make it and sample their hard work! You will need to borrow some measuring jugs from food tech and make a trip to home-bargains for some cheap ingredients.

My students loved this lesson and even stayed at break to make another one! There really is a lot of Maths involved, they have to work out proportions, convert measures, calculate cost, profit and then interpret scales and they certainly won’t be forgetting it in a hurry!

Get in touch @numberloving and check out our free and premium resources in our NumberLoving Store.

An eggciting eggstravaganza of eggresources

In the run up to Easter it’s a good idea to have some fun activities up your sleeve, so here are some of NumberLoving’s favourite Easter resources.

All children (and some adults) love a good Easter egg hunt, check out the treasure hunt activities in Store to inject a bit of hunting fun into your lessons next week. I have adapted this one on BIDMAS to make it a bit more ‘Eastery’ so get it stuck up around the playground and let the kids loose! (template here if you want it!)

There is also this great Easter themed trail shared by Phrankie on the TES, although it is aimed at KS2 it would be fine for low ability Year 7’s and easily adaptable for others too!

Get your students doing some origami and making these fantastic bunny boxes, they can be folded to fit an egg in the middle and have to be inflated by mouth at the end! A great fun activity for KS3.

Another nice origami activity is this bunny, the instructions are really clear in the video which makes it great to use in class!

If you want something a bit less hands-on then try some of these Easter themed worksheets from Ten Ticks. Another nice worksheet on combinations is this one from primaryresources.co.uk, this is easily extendible for higher ability students too.

If you are brave then you might risk making some Easter nests with the students (cooking required!). Give students this recipe for 30 cakes and get them to work out the required quantities for 5, then get them measuring and weighing and prepare for some chaos!

Any other nice Easter activities would be much appreciated so please send them our way! Get in touch @numberloving and check out our free and premium resources in our NumberLoving Store.